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14 Aug 2014

1989 Ferrari F40 review had one Italian cyclist seeing rosso

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We’ve got to say: we’re really enjoying the MotorWeek incarnation of this Throwback Thursday trend that seems to be enveloping everyone’s social media feeds. MW has an almost impossibly deep library of historical tape to draw from, meaning each recent Thursday has met with another gem dropped on YouTube.

The last old-timer that drew our interest (and yours, based on all the comments) was a sports car showdown of epic, 1990s proportions. Today though, we’ve got one of the most legendary supercars of all time, the Ferrari F40, presented with the wholesome goodness that is John Davis’ signature style. Any classic road test of the the F40 would probably earn our clicks, but this particular video comes with some added drama around the 5:10 mark.

Don’t rush there, it’s fun to listen to the period-correct praise along the way, but prepare yourself for a near-miss that’s almost as breathtaking as the Ferrari itself.

Continue reading 1989 Ferrari F40 review had one Italian cyclist seeing rosso

1989 Ferrari F40 review had one Italian cyclist seeing rosso originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 14 Aug 2014 17:01:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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13 Aug 2014

Ferrari 250 GTO could fetch as much as $75 million at auction

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Ferrari 250 GTO

Last month we reported on a Ferrari 250 GTO heading for the auction block at Pebble Beach. We knew at the time it would break records and bring in tens of millions of dollars. But now that the gavel is about to drop, it looks like even our projections could fall short.

According to a report on Bloomberg, citing the classic car authorities at Hagerty Insurance, the GTO in question (pictured above) could fetch upwards of $60 million and as much as $75 million when the auction takes place two days from now in Monterey, CA.

Hagerty’s reported estimate would not only blow the previous records out of the water, but would eclipse the pre-sale estimate attributed to Bonhams, the auction house handling its sale, which placed its value between $30 million and $40 million.

The last time we heard of a 250 GTO trading hands (through a private party sale, as they usually do), it reportedly sold for $52 million. The current record for the most expensive car ever sold at auction was also set by Bonhams last year when it auctioned off Juan Manuel Fangio’s 1954 Mercedes-Benz W196 “Silver Arrow” grand prix racer for nearly $30 million. Whether it’s Bonhams’ estimate, Hagerty’s projection or the precedent of that last GTO that ultimately prevails, we’re almost certain to have a new world record on our hands this weekend.

Ferrari 250 GTO could fetch as much as $75 million at auction originally appeared on Autoblog on Wed, 13 Aug 2014 10:56:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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13 Aug 2014

What you missed on 8.13.14

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Daily U-Turn

All hail the 2015 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat2015 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat

Now they’ve gone and done it. By dropping the ludicrous supercharged Hemi V8 from the Challenger Hellcat into the chassis of the four-door Charger, Dodge has created what it is calling the The World’s Most Powerful Sedan. For those unaware, there are a total of 707 freaking horses stampeding under the long hood of the Charger you see to your right, all sent to the back wheels in what we imagine will result in the most glorious burnouts the world has ever seen.

2015 Subaru WRX long-term updateAutoblog long-term Subaru WRX

It’s been lovely having the 2015 Subaru WRX in our long-term fleet. Even with terrible weather recently making things miserable for our Detroit crew, our WR Blue Subie didn’t miss a beat, delivering our editorial staff to their desired destinations with plenty of turbocharged aplomb. But we’ve also been finding a few flaws with the darling ‘Rex. Read all about ’em, here.

Mom surprised by new carSon surprises his mom with a 1973 Saab

Aww, shucks. While we start feverishly shoving pennies, nickels and dimes into a piggy bank in an effort to start saving up to buy our collective mothers their dream cars – my dear Mom would love to cruise her ‘hood in a classic Beetle convertible – join us in watching the surprised reaction of one such mother as she’s handed the keys to her own, a 1973 Saab 99 in a lovely shade of orange.

Top Stories

What you missed on 8.13.14 originally appeared on Autoblog on Wed, 13 Aug 2014 19:31:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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12 Aug 2014

The 11 most expensive American cars ever

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Here’s a Pro Tip for all you would-be classic car investors out there: buy Ferraris. With the Pebble Beach festivities kicking off this week, including any number high end car auctions, we thought it would be entertaining to compile a list of some to the most expensive cars ever sold with the bang of a gavel. Trouble is, once you get past the splendor of everyone’s favorite Italian sports car maker, that list is pretty boring.

Ferrari dominates the all-time auction sales list; seven of the top ten most expensive cars sold wear the Cavallino Rampante badge, as well as more than half of the top fifty. Sure, a nearly $30-million Mercedes-Benz W196 racecar might be the new top dog as of last year, but it’s even possible that Ferrari could take that title back in Monterey this weekend. Long story short: we think a list of the most expensive American cars ever sold at auction is a lot more entertaining to read. Hell, our list has a friggin’ Batmobile on it, how can it go wrong?

Follow on below for the top ten cars that are red, white, blue and a whole lot of green.

Continue reading The 11 most expensive American cars ever

The 11 most expensive American cars ever originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 12 Aug 2014 12:45:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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12 Aug 2014

Xcar tries to figure out what makes the Miata so great

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Mazda Miata History

Over the past 25 years and 3 model generations, the Mazda MX-5 Miata has shown that you don’t have to be the best to be a massive success. The little, Japanese roadster has never been the absolute peak of automotive performance, but it’s precise handling, good reliability and frugal running costs have helped make it a star. Autoblog recently tried to give you the experience of driving one on video, and now Xcar Films has made its own in an attempt to show what makes this droptop an icon.

As Xcar puts it, the Miata isn’t the world’s best sports car, but it is the world’s favorite. When they were originally designing the roadster, Mazda’s engineers took everything that made British droptops from the ’60s great, and junked all of the stuff that made them a terror to own. The result was a car that would start up everyday with no fuss and get drivers wherever they needed to go with a huge grin on their face.

The fourth-generation Miata is imminently on the way for its September 3 unveiling, and the very early rumors indicate that Mazda doesn’t plan to rock the boat too much with the latest one. It supposedly rides on a longer wheelbase and wider track but with the weight trimmed by over 200 pounds. Check out Xcar‘s video for a primer on MX-5 history and why the automotive world loves this little roadster.

Continue reading Xcar tries to figure out what makes the Miata so great

Xcar tries to figure out what makes the Miata so great originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 12 Aug 2014 17:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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12 Aug 2014

A Ferrari Dino 308 GT4 retrospective, by Gear Patrol

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Ferrari 308 GT4

When we think of desirable Ferraris from the 1970s, the choices are somewhat thin. Obviously, there was the 365 GTB/4, better known as the legendary Daytona, but that was initially a product of the 1960s. Really, aside from the arrival of the stylish 308, the 1970s weren’t a strong decade for Ferrari.

As Ferrari the brand grows, though, even some of its less-desirable cars are becoming popular among enthusiasts. Considering that, we should begin hearing more mid-70s Ferrari love, such as that being espoused by Anthony Rimicci, for his Dino 308 GT4.

As the first mass-produced, mid-engined V8 Ferrari, the Dino-badged 308 GT4 can best be thought of as the earliest ancestor to the 458 Italia (other mid-engined Ferraris, like the 250LM and 288 GTO are more akin to the Enzo and LaFerrari). It was also the final car in the Dino line, while many of the vehicles were rebadged as Ferraris, following lackluster sales.

Take a look at the video from Gear Patrol to see what it was about this 1970s relic that captured Rimicci’s attention.

Continue reading A Ferrari Dino 308 GT4 retrospective, by Gear Patrol

A Ferrari Dino 308 GT4 retrospective, by Gear Patrol originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 12 Aug 2014 14:58:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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12 Aug 2014

Range Rover #1 headed to auction block

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1970 Land Rover Range Rover

There’s a scene in the Nicholas Cage version of Gone In 60 Seconds, where the lead car thief marches into a Ferrari dealership and laments a newer version of Maranello’s finest, claiming he saw three outside his local Starbucks and calling their drivers “self-indulgent wieners,” before talking about a 1967 275 GTB/4. The salesman rightly points out that purchasing such a car would make Cage’s character a connoisseur. This is Land Rover’s equivalent of that 275 – the very first Range Rover, wearing chassis number 001.

The rare Land Rover is slated to cross the Silverstone Auctions’ block on September 4, where it’s expected to fetch anywhere from 100,000 to 140,000 pounds ($167,000 to $235,000 at today’s rates).

Built in late 1969, this particular example was registered some six months before the Range Rover’s official launch date. It was considered “lost” until the 1990s, according to Silverstone, thanks in large part to a new Bahama Gold paint job and registration changes. Since its rediscovery, this numbers-matching SUV underwent a six-year, ground-up restoration.

Take a look up top at our fully gallery of images of this rarity, and then scroll down for the press release. And if you happen to be in London in early September and have about $230,000 burning a hole in your pocket, pick this classic. Then head to Starbucks and show up the self-indulgent wieners of the world.

Continue reading Range Rover #1 headed to auction block

Range Rover #1 headed to auction block originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 12 Aug 2014 14:16:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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12 Aug 2014

What you missed on 8.12.14

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Daily U-Turn

The 11 most expensive American carsBatmobile auction

Yes, we know. If you’re looking for the most expensive cars in the world, you’re probably limiting your search parameters to cars built in the country of Italy, home, of course, to Ferrari. We all know that. But what about America? The land of the free and home of the brave is rife with automobile history, and some of it is worth a heck of a lot of money. Plus, Batmobile.

First Ride: Energica EgoEnergica Ego

And now we travel back to the land of sausages and sports cars, except the subject we’re focusing on today isn’t a car at all. The Energica Ego hails from Italy, and gets its power courtesy of a high-tech lithium ion battery pack and a permanent magnet AC electric motor. It’s quick, and it’s a hoot to ride.

BMW carsBMW maintenance no longer transferable

BMW is altering the terms of its four-year, 50,000-mile Maintenance Program for new buyers. According to the automaker, the program can only be transferred to new owners if they live in the same household. As ever, there’s plenty of fine print to read through, and you can find all the details by clicking on the link above.

Top Stories

What you missed on 8.12.14 originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 12 Aug 2014 19:33:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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11 Aug 2014

Lightweight E-Type to show historic side of Jaguar Special Operations in Monterey

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Jaguar Lightweight E-Type

Jaguar has made a lot of great vehicles over the years, but as far as historians are concerned, it still very much lives in the shadow of the original E-Type, small as it was. In its image, Jaguar has made two generations of XK and the new F-Type, but what we have here is the most faithful continuation of the E-Type heritage yet.

Alongside the Range Rover Sport SVR and the F-Type Project 7 (making its US debut), Jaguar Land Rover and its new Special Operations division will roll into Pebble Beach this year with the continuation Lightweight E-Type. Of the 72,500 E-Types which Jaguar built between 1961 and 1975, only a dozen were Lightweight versions, and they remain the most coveted E-Types of all. It originally planned on building 18 examples, though, and five decades later, it’s now committed to completing that original production run in faithful detail.

Jaguar Lightweight E-TypeThe Lightweight E-Type was based on the standard roadster and was homologated as such, just with some key upgrades to make it lighter and faster. The biggest change, of course, was the lightweight aluminum bodywork that cut 205 pounds off the curb weight. To replicate it, Jaguar took the last example (the only one made in 1964 after the original eleven were made in ’63), scanned half its body surface, mirrored it to ensure symmetry and set about reproducing it with the same standard of materials available in the Sixties (and resisting the urge to go with more modern grades of aluminum). 75 percent of the 230 components are made in-house, with the largest stampings outsourced and built on machinery built to Jaguar’s specifications off-site.

Like the originals, the continuation Lightweight E-Type uses an engine based on that in the Le Mans-winning D-Type, but ditches the iron block in favor of an aluminum one. The 3.8-liter inline-six features triple carbs, dry-sump lubrication and optional mechanical fuel-injection to deliver upwards of 300 horsepower and about 280 pound-feet of torque, channeled through a four-speed manual, fully synchronized with a single-plate clutch, lightweight flywheel and Powr-Lok limited slip differential.

All of that rides on 15-inch perforated wheels wearing Dunlop racing tires. The Lightweight packs the same rear brakes as the standard E-Type but upgraded front discs, with no servo, fitted to a double wishbone front and independent wishbone rear suspension. The rack-and-pinion steering is fitted to a wood rim in an interior swathed in period-correct Connolly leather under a standard aluminum hardtop. But with only six to be built, each one will be made to order – fully FIA certified for historic racing – at the new Jaguar Heritage workshop at the company’s historic home at Browns Lane. The example pictured here, to bow in Monterey, is Car Zero that will be handed over to the Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust as part of its permanent collection.

Continue reading Lightweight E-Type to show historic side of Jaguar Special Operations in Monterey

Lightweight E-Type to show historic side of Jaguar Special Operations in Monterey originally appeared on Autoblog on Mon, 11 Aug 2014 19:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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08 Aug 2014

Car companies used to cook up sales with recipe books

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Ford cookbook

The evolution of automotive marketing has undergone a number of strange phases. Few, though, match the strangeness of the 1930s to 1950s, when automotive marketers turned to cookbooks as a means of promoting their vehicles. Yes, cookbooks. We can’t make this stuff up, folks.

This bizarre trend led to General Motors distributing cookbooks under the guise of its then-subsidiary Frigidaire. Ford, meanwhile, offered a compilation of recipes from Ford Credit Employees (shown above). The cookbook-craze wasn’t limited to domestic manufacturers, though. As The Detroit News discovered, both Rolls-Royce and Volkswagen got in on the trend, although not until the 1970s.

The News has the full story on this strange bit of marketing. Head over and take a look.

Car companies used to cook up sales with recipe books originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 08 Aug 2014 08:45:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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